Our Organic Systems Plan 

"Nature always wears the colors of the spirit."

― Ralph Waldo Emerson

Organic Farm

Food production in harmony with nature. 

In establishing Bodhi Farms, we were tasked with the decision on whether or not to become a Certified USDA Organic farm. While we believe that the Certified USDA Organic program has certainly led the way with regards to producer transparency, in addition to consumer education around healthy food, we opted not to invest the time and considerable cost in this certification. Instead, we think the next step in the health food trend is a more localized approach where farmers and producers take responsibility for growing food as sustainably as possible while being transparent about their practices. As our customers, we invite you to enjoy our organic produce. We hope to serve as an example of best practices and encourage you to share our story with other farmers and producers.

Please check back as we will update this as needed.

FARM OVERVIEW & HISTORY

1) Land Plan 

Our farm consists of 3 different parcels that you can see illustrated on the above map (COMING SOON). These parcels are as follows:

  • Food Forest #1. The size of this parcel is .50 acre. It is primarily used to grow fruit trees, berry bushes,  herbs and perennial flowers. 

  • Food Forest #2. The size of this parcel is .41 acre. It is primarily used to grow fruit trees, berry bushes, shrubs, herbs and perennial flowers. 

  • Production Gardens. The size of this parcel is 1.4 acres. It is primarily used to grow annual fruits and vegetables. 

2) Boundaries 

  • Food Forest #1. The north boundary of Food Forest #1 is the treeline that surrounds South Cottonwood Creek. The western boundary is the main gravel road. The Southern boundary is a gravel “service” road that leads from the main road to the restaurant. The eastern boundary is  a gravel walking path that leads from the entrance to the restaurant On the north  and east sides of Food Forest #1 the forest that surrounds South Cottonwood Creek, and the creek itself serve as buffers to prevent contact with prohibited substances used on adjacent lands. On the south and west sides of Food Forest #1, gravel roads serve as buffers to prevent contact with prohibited substances. The abutting lands are  un-managed pasture and lawn, meaning prohibited pesticides, herbicides, fungicides, or fertilizers are not applied in these areas. Organic lands and crops are not in close proximity to or at risk of being exposed to any risk factors.

  • Food Forest #2. North and west boundaries of the Food Forest #2 is a gravel access road and a gravel parking area, respectively. The south and east  boundaries of Food Forest #2 is  a fenceline. On the north and east sides of Food Forest #2, the gravel road access road and gravel parking areas serve as buffers that prevent contact with prohibited substances on adjacent lands. On the south and west sides, the fence lines serve as buffers that prevent contact with prohibited substances on adjacent lands. Organic lands and crops are not in close proximity to or at risk of being exposed to any risk factors. The abutting lands are un-managed pasture and lawn, meaning prohibited pesticides, herbicides, fungicides, or fertilizers are not applied in these areas.

  • Production Gardens. The north boundaries of our Production Gardens include a gravel access road, the restaurant patio, and the restaurant yard. The south and west boundary of our production garden is our gravel access road. The east boundary of our Production Gardens is a fenceline. The gravel access road, restaurant patio and restaurant yard will serve as buffers to prevent contact with prohibited substances on adjacent lands to the north of the Production Gardens. The gravel access road will serve as a buffer to prevent contact with prohibited substances to the west and south of the Production Gardens. A fence line will serve as a buffer to prevent contact with prohibited substances on adjacent lands to the east of the Production Gardens. Organic lands and crops are not in close proximity to or at risk of being exposed to any risk factors. The abutting lands are un-managed pasture and lawn, meaning prohibited pesticides, herbicides, fungicides, or fertilizers are not applied in these areas.

 

3) Production Practices & Management History.

In order to understand the historical use of the property, we consulted with the previous owner. We focused our research on the three years preceding our initial planting in 2020. 

  • 2019. We purchased the property in the spring of 2019. The initial months of this year found the ground covered in snow and unused so no activity took place on the property before we acquired it. For the remainder of the year all of the land was unused agriculturally. 

  • 2018. No activity other than horse grazing took place seasonally. There were no soil fertility or pest management practices, applications, or materials used including any synthetic fertilizers, pesticides, fungicides, herbicides, treated seed, sewage sludge or biosolids. 

  • 2017. No activity other than horse grazing took place seasonally. There were no soil fertility or pest management practices, applications, or materials used including any synthetic fertilizers, pesticides, fungicides, herbicides, treated seed, sewage sludge or biosolids. 

 

DESCRIPTION OF OPERATION, SOIL & CROP NUTRIENT MANAGEMENT
& CROP ROTATION

 

1) Crops / Crop Types. We have selected the following perennials, annual production, and fruits to adorn our farm and consume our time; 

  • Herbaceous Perennials: Bee Balm, Black-Eyed Susan, Blanket Flower, Borage, Catmint, False Indigo Bush, French Tarragon, Lupine, Oregano, Purple Coneflower, Sage, Sweet Cicely, Yarrow, Lavender, Meadow Sage, Valerian, Echinacea, Lemon Balm, Mint, Chamomile, Sage, rhubarb, strawberries

  • Annual Production:  Arugula, Basil, Broccoli, Carrot, Cayenne Pepper, Chives, Cucumber, Garlic, Kale, Lettuce, Onion, Oregano, Parsley, Peas,Bell Pepper, Jalapeno Pepper, Poblano Pepper, Potato, Spinach, Summer Squash, Winter Squash, Sunflowers, Cherry tomatoes, Slicing tomatoes, Watermelon, Zinnias, Marigold , nasturtium, dill, cilantro

  • Woody Perennials: Apple, Plum, Cherry, and Pear Trees, Red Currant, Black Currant, Golden Currant, Hazelnut, Jostaberry, Raspberry, Japanese Barberry, Honeyberry, Bush Honeysuckle, Sea Buckthorn, Silver Buffaloberry, Nanking Cherry, Mountain Huckleberry

  • Cover Crops: Oats, Vetch, Field Peas, Red Clover, Buckwheat 

 

2) Production Sites & Methods. For our initial grow year, we are leasing offsite greenhouse space as we plan to construct our own greenhouse on the farm this year.  We are starting our seeds in an organically certified, compost-based living soil mix. We will transplant the seeds we start in the greenhouse to our Production Gardens. We will also be direct-seeding a variety of crops straight into the soil in our Production Gardens.. Lettuce and strawberries will be grown in a poly low-tunnel, tomatoes, peppers and herbs will be grown in our hoop  house and the rest of our crops will be grown in our fields. We will be mulching some of the rows in our fields with black landscape fabric, and other rows will be mulched with hay. We will seed Red Clover  between the rows of crops in our Production Garden to act as a green mulch.
 

3) Soil Improvement / Crop Nutrient Management and Rotation. To maintain or improve soil organic matter; manage weeds and pests; conserve soil and control erosion; manage nutrients; and introduce biological diversity, we break our practices down into 3 categories;  

 

  • Annual Cropping Systems.  We will follow the following principles to guide our annual crop rotations. Follow legume crops with nitrogen-demanding crops. Grow less-nitrogen-demanding crops years after a legume sod. Grow annual crops for only one year in a specific location.  Not following  crops with a closely related species. Use crop sequences that help with weed control. Incorporate deep-rooted crops into rotation.  Grow crops that leave large amounts of residue. Group crops into blocks according to plant family, nutrient requirements, and harvest timing.

  • Perennial Systems. Our perennial systems are in the form of food forests and perennial borders. Food Forests mimic the architecture of woodland ecosystems with a canopy, shrub, herb, groundcover and herb layer. The canopy layer will consist of fruit trees, the shrub layer will be a variety of berry bushes and nuts, the herb layer will be a combination of flowering perennial and soil-building plants. These areas are  intended to function as mini-ecosystems while supporting the surrounding annual production. 

  • Management of Borders.  We will be using a combination of fencing and hedgerows to manage the borders of both our Food Forest areas and Production Gardens.

 

4) Monitoring Methods. We verify the effectiveness of our soil/crop nutrient management and crop rotation plans by doing biannual soil characteristic analysis and nutrient and organic matter content analysis in each plot before planting in the spring, and after harvest in the fall. Partnering with the Department of Land Resources and Environmental Services Department with Montana State University. We will be doing visual crop observation on a daily basis, noting any and all characteristics or variables in our crops. We will be doing crop quality comparison on field crops grown in different areas of the property. Additionally, we will be taking note and recording biodiversity on the farm.

 

5) Recordkeeping System.  Our record keeping system will include planting records and field maps including crop and location for each growing season. It will include input purchase receipts, invoices, delivery tags, or custom application of fertility and soil amendments and input application records: material (brand name/formulation, manufacturer), rate, date & location

 

COMPOST & MANURE

 

1) Compost Management.  We follow the below guidelines for compost management;  

  • Storage & Cycling. We utilize open / 3 sided bins that are 8’ x 8’. We optimize cycling of nutrients to protect soil quality by aerating / turning our compost piles with a tractor implement.  Our compost is finished in roughly 3-4 months (depending on conditions), and it is finished when the product's internal temperature has dropped below 70 degrees fahrenheit and is dark, crumbly and smells like earth.

  • Contamination Prevention. Our crop contamination prevention is described above in the Soil & Crop Nutrient Management section. Our exposure to contamination comes from our customer’s use of our waste disposal bins that are broken down into three cans; compost, recycling, and waste. We are required to sort through the compost collection cans to ensure that prohibited items are not accidentally discarded into the wrong bin. 

 

2) Recordkeeping system. We maintain records of the compost pile’s start date, internal temperature frequency & timing of aeration, color, texture and odor. Once our barn is built, we will maintain a whiteboard inside of the barn where this activity is logged for each month. 

 

3) Manure Source. We use manure from our own farm animals. From time to time we purchase manure, but we require documentation of compliance that verifies that the source of the manure is organic as well as a copy of the time, temperature and turning schedule, and Certificate of Analysis (COA) for microbial activity.  with regulations regarding production, and relevant quality analysis (e.g., Certificate of Analysis: microbiology relevant to food safety)  produced on farm, with records of production including: methods (in-vessel/static pile with aeration vs. windrow); ingredients or feedstock; temperature and turnings; curing or finishing. 

 

NATURAL RESOURCES OF THE OPERATION & BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION MANAGEMENT

 

1) Natural Resources. Our farm is a diverse and beautiful property, here are some details about it; 

  • Soil: We plan on getting in-depth soil analyses done at the farm to determine classification, slope, texture, structure, organic matter content and other characteristics of our soil type on the farm to help guide our soil management practices.

  • Water: Groundwater lies roughly 5 feet under the surface of the soil on the farm. We will be using water from Cottonwood Creek as our source for irrigation water. Our wash water will come from our well. Cottonwood creek is a wonderful resource for us at Bodhi Farms and the Bozeman community, we will only be using as much water as we need to water our crops and well below our water rights. 

  • Woodlands: The forests and woodlands on our property provide a number of benefits for both our agricultural production and biodiversity in our ecosystem. Our forests serve as a windbreak which help to protect delicate crops from potentially damaging winds, as well as provide habitat for animals such as deer, elk, turkey, lynx, coyote and an endless variety of birds and insects.

  • Wetlands: The beautiful Cottonwood Creek that runs through our property maintains a delicate habitat along its banks. We reduce foot traffic by offering offset pathways to help maintain the health of these wetlands.   

  • Wildlife / Biodiversity.  We delight and encourage biodiversity on our farm, as it strengthens the ecological systems that our farm relies on to function. That being said, there are various noxious weeds and invasive species that threaten the harmony of these systems. We spend an immense amount of time on our property making observations, noting and identifying noxious weeds and invasive species that may have a presence at the farm. We will have a list of species, and an identification key of all known invasive species in our region of Montana. We will implement any and all management recommendations from the USDA, Gallatin Invasive Species Alliance and Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks.

 

2) Natural Resource Improvement.  We adhere to the following practices to maintain or improve natural resources; to foster cycling of resources, promote ecological balance, and conserve biodiversity. 

  • Soil. Build soil organic matter content to foster a diversity of beneficial soil organisms; increase water- and nutrient holding capacity and resilience under drought/changing climatic condition.

    1. Rotate Crops. Plant cover crops or green manures  

    2. Apply compost

    3. Create physical and/or biological features to slow water/air movement to retain soil particles 

    4. Maintain filter strips or grassed waterways, hedgerows or windbreaks to minimize erosion

    5. Maximize soil cover; reduce time & land area when soil is exposed to wind or water erosion

    6. Time tillage operations for appropriate soil moisture to prevent compaction; improve tilth

    7. Carry out farm operations under appropriate weather conditions to prevent water/wind erosion

    8. Use nutrient budgets that consider crop needs to calculate rates of organic fertilizers to be applied

    9. Manage nutrient applications (material, application method, rate and timing) to minimize losses

 

  • Water Conservation & Quality.  

    1. Plant crops and varieties appropriate to the climate and region (consider water demands)

    2. Manage cropland, field & farm borders, wetlands to increase water infiltration and reduce runoff

    3. Maintain or improve watershed and wildlife habitat (woodlands, wetlands and riparian areas)

    4. Time & calculate fertilizer applications to meet crop needs; prevent nutrient loss or contamination

    5. Utilize wetlands to manage wastewater and improve water quality

    6. Avoid overdrafting water sources; balance use with rates of replenishment; facilitate recharge 

    7. Match irrigation quantity and timing to crop requirements

    8. Manage irrigation applications to prevent nutrient leaching beyond the crop root zone

    9. Maintain or improve irrigation efficiency

    10. Monitor water systems regularly and repair leaks promptly

    11. Use technologies and techniques to increase efficiency of energy use for pumping 

 

  • Woodlands and Wetlands 

    1. We have a goal of developing a fish / aquatic habitat improvement plan for the stretch of Cottonwood Creek on our property. 

    2. The previous owner allowed horse grazing all along the creek banks and we look forward to seeing how this habitat repairs itself naturally without their intrusion. 

    3. We added a groundwater pond to our landscape and in doing so designed shallow banks to support a healthy wetlands ecology along its banks. 

 

  • Wildlife, Ecological Balance and Biodiversity (including Control of Invasive Species)

    1. We created two animal movement corridors on our land plan to encourage animal movement around our gardens. 

    2. We have a goal of building two owl houses on our farm to keep their presence in our food chain.

    3. Plant a diversity of crops or genetic strains of the same crop

    4. Plant or manage for diversity in cover crops, green manures or pastures

    5. Plant or manage for diversity of species and types of non-crop plants on the farm 

    6. Maintain or improve habitat for wildlife, beneficial organisms and natural enemies of pests

    7. Minimize use of pesticides, especially broad-spectrum materials that impact non-target species

    8. Select pest management materials that are less toxic; more pest-specific and/or biodegradable

    9. Use exclusion, repellant, and other non-lethal pest and predator management whenever practical

    10. Encourage natural wild predation-prey relationships to manage pests (prevent livestock as prey)

    11. Design fencing (materials and placement) to minimize entrapment and provide for wildlife corridors 

    12. Prevent pest or invasive species introductions by using weed-, pest- and disease-free seed, planting stock, soil amendments and mulch materials

    13. Learn to identify non-native invasive plant and animal species

    14. Monitor for new invasive species

    15. Develop a management plan to remove, control, and reduce the spread of invasive species

    16. Recognize rare, threatened, endangered species and their habitat; develop protection plans 

 

SEEDS, ANNUAL SEEDLINGS & PLANTING STOCK

 

1) Certified Organic Seedlings, Seed and Planting Stock. We only purchase certified organic and non-GMO seeds, seedlings, and planting stock. Our purchase records reflect this. 

2) Farm Produced Organic Annual Seedlings. Production records must show crop, date, quantity, materials (e.g., planting medium and fertilizers).

 

PEST, DISEASE & WEED MANAGEMENT

1) Pests, Diseases and Weeds. Our recurrent or potential pests, diseases, and weed that we find on our farm are as follows. An * indicates an invasive species.

  • Arthropods: Aphids, Mites, Whiteflies, Mealybugs, Earworms, Hornworms

  • Vertebrates:  Pocket gophers, Moles, Ground Squirrels, Voles, Starling

  • Diseases:  blossom-end rot, powdery mildew, early/late blight, rusts

  • Weeds: Canada thistle*, sweetgrass*, common tansy* leafy spurge* 

 

2) Weed Management Plan. The following preventative practices and strategies make up our weed management plan; 

  • Monitoring. We actively explore our property on a regular basis and monitor it for any and all weeds and remove them if found. All above listed weeds will be posted in our barn for ease of identification.    

  • Crop Rotation. Our above described crop rotation practices play a crucial role in weed management. 

  • Nutrient Management. We plant a portion of our production areas in cover crops and green manure crops such as oats, field peas, vetch, red clover. Our crop rotation also plays a role in nutrient management.

  • Tillage. We utilize a reduced tillage approach to minimize soil compaction, the formation of a plow-pan,and to minimize the disturbance of our soil structure and for new weed emergence.

  • Inter / Overseeding. We utilize both inter and overseeding practices by both adding cover crops between our rows in our production garden which helps prevent the emergence of weeds, and overseeding to plant cover crops, without disturbing the soil and potentially creating space for new weeds to grow, to prepare our winter cover crops.

  • Early Seeding. We seed our cover crops as soon as the soil can be worked, this helps create soil structure early in the season and reduces the potential for nutrient loss, soil loss and soil compaction. 

  • Delayed Planting. We utilize delayed planting when we confront a situation where conditions are not favorable for soil health to plant during a certain period of time, such as a large rain event. 

  • Mowing. We mow a large portion of our property that is not cultivated, though not all of it. Our mowing keeps weeds from expanding their footprint and spreading seeds. We will also be mowing our cover crops, such as red clover, for use as a green mulch.     

  • Allowed Herbicides. Herbicides listed under USDA Organic certification.

  • Cleaning Equipment Between Fields. We thoroughly clean our tools and equipment after we are done working in a section of a field, before moving into another section.

  • Field / Orchard Sanitation. Any equipment that is used in a particular field is to be thoroughly sanitized with a bleach solution before being used in a different field. We thoroughly sanitize our orchard equipment after working with each individual tree. 

 

3) Crop Pest Management Plan. The following preventative practices and strategies make up our crop pest management plan; 

  • Monitoring.We use a daily and weekly “field walk” to monitor our fields and look at each individual crop to visually identify the emergence of any crop pests. We keep detailed notes of any irregularities or emergence of pests.

  • Learning pest life Cycles.We use phenological notesl records to learn about pest life cycles and their peculiarities on the farm. We also follow the advice of the Extension Office at Montana State University.

  • Crop Rotation. Our above described crop rotation practices play a crucial role in pest management. 

  • Resistant Species / Varieties: We select crop varieties with resistance to as many locally common pests as possible.

  • Crop Diversification: We utilize diversity in our crops to reduce the likelihood of pests

  • Repellents: If necessary we utilize Organically certified physical or chemical repellents for common pests.

  • Biological Control: We utilize biological control for insect pests and diseases using other organisms which rely on predation, parasitism and herbivory, or some other natural mechanisms. For example, we have constructed owl boxes, whose main prey are undesirable rodents, to encourage the presence of owls on our property.

  • Natural Enemy Habitat Development: We develop habitat for natural enemies of pests, like insectary plants in our field such as Marigolds, clover, yarrow, chamomile and dill.

  •  Weed Host Management: As we welcome guests’ vehicles onto our farm, we keep all guest vehicles on gravel parking surfaces. While guests are on property, we ask them to stay on our gravel pathways as well. 

  • Water Management: To reduce the occurrence of undesirable weeds, such as noxious weeds and invasive species, we structure our water management system to ensure our crops ability to be as healthy as possible, which in turn reduces the ability for these undesirable weeds to take root. 

 

4) Crop Disease Management. The preventative practices and strategies that make up our crop disease management plan are as follows: 

  • Crop Rotation: Our crop rotation if further described above in the crop rotation section. 

  • Resistant Species & Varieties: We select crop varieties with resistance to as many locally common diseases as possible.

  • Sanitizing Tools & Equipment: We sanitize all tools used in a particular field or on a particular crop using a bleach solution before moving on to another crop or field.

  • Water & Irrigation Management: We irrigate all of our parcels with water from Cottonwood Creek as we have the water rights to do so. We do not test this water, as it is fresh snow melt from the Gallatin Mountains. 

  • Material Inputs. Hay, Perlite, Diatomaceous Earth, neem oil.

 

MATERIALS LIST

 

1) Materials List. Below is a list of materials we use or plan to use, including soil amendments, seeds and planting stock, inoculants, coatings and seed treatments, pest / disease /weed management substances and spreaders, crop production aids, post-harvest handling materials, cleaners, sanitizers as well as any other materials applied to soil, crops, water, or stored products. This list will be updated as we continue to develop our crop management systems.

(MATERIALS LIST COMING SOON)

2) Recordkeeping System. All purchases from all vendors are stored in our offices for 5 years. 

 

LABELING & REPRESENTATION OF ORGANIC PRODUCT

1) Brand. We do not label our produce, but we always represent ourselves as Bodhi Farms. 

2) Lot Numbering System. Our lot-numbering system for non-retail packaging works like this: Outgoing lot numbers are linked to production logs or batch sheets.

 

CONTAMINATION & COMMINGLING RISK ASSESSMENT & PREVENTION PLAN

 

1) Prohibited Materials. Prohibited materials on our farm include:

Ash from manure burning, Arsenic, Calcium chloride, Lead salts, Potassium chloride,  Rotenone, Sodium fluoaluminate, Sodium nitrate, Strychnine, Tobacco dust, Strychnine

Areas of potential risk exist in our farm operations include:

Cottonwood Creek, trailers used to haul compost, farm equipment used for seeding and harvest such as seeders, plant trays, harvest bins, and produce packaging. Food contact surfaces, such as wash tables, sinks and root-washer. Crop storage facilities such as fridge, freezer and root cellar. 

 

  • Potential Risks. The potential risks associated with these prohibited materials include crop loss, damage to ecosystem and biodiversity and pose potential risk for human health. 

  • Prevention Plan. Our prevention plan to reduce the above risks is to simply not allow these materials on the property and create physical barriers to block any potential drift from neighboring properties.

  • Monitoring Practices. In order to properly monitor these risks, we will implement monitoring practices, and recordkeeping processes to verify and document that our contamination and commingling plan is effectively implemented.

 

2) Heavy Metals. The  areas of potential risk the following materials we use: Compost, Fertilizer and Manure. 

  • Potential Risks. Heavy metals in contaminated crops cause losses in crop production and potential risks for human health.

  • Prevention Plan. Our prevention plan to reduce the above risks is to monitor our compost, fertilizer and manure production and perform testing to be sure there is no contamination of these products. 

  • Monitoring Practices. In order to properly monitor these risks, we will implement monitoring practices, and recordkeeping processes to verify and document that our contamination plan is effectively implemented.

 

3) Crop Nutrients. These risks are addressed in the sections on Crop Nutrient Management, Crop Rotation and Natural Resources in further detail, but the risks associated with the nutrients we use for our crops are: 

  • Potential Risks. The potential risks associated with these crop nutrients are seepage of nutrients due to overapplication or application of nutrients in the wrong places. 

  • Prevention Plan. Our prevention plan to reduce the above risks is to monitor our nutrient needs and application and to perform periodic testing of water, soil and crops.

  • Monitoring Practices. In order to properly monitor these risks, we  will implement monitoring practices, and recordkeeping processes to verify and document that our nutrient contamination and risk plan is effectively implemented.

 

4) Pathogens. The following pathogens are used or found in soil, water, air, human or animal-borne pathogens in the following areas as they relate to the operations in our greenhouse and barn: Salmonella Typhi or non-typhoidal Salmonella, Shigella Spp., Norovirus, Hepatitis A, E. coli O157:H7 or other E. coli, Cryptosporidium spp.2, Giardia duodenalis3, Naegleria fowleri

  • Worker Health & Hygiene. We will adhere to rigorous sanitation standards, including but not limited to: regular hand washing, use of gloves, facemasks and other PPE that reduce potential for exposure or transmission of pathogens.

  • Site and Dust Management. We will ensure that dust is kept to a minimum by keeping any potential sources for dust moist.

  • Irrigation Water. We will ensure that irrigation water is periodically tested for common pathogens.

  • Facility Cleaning. We will subscribe to a regular daily cleaning and sanitation schedule to be sure and minimize the possibility of pathogen exposure.

  • Product Rinsing. We will adhere to the USDA’s Organic standards when washing and rinsing produce.

  • Product Cooling. We will adhere to the USDA’s Organic standards to prevent pathogens in product cooling systems.

  • Soil Amendments. We will adhere to the USDA’s Organic standards to prevent pathogens in soil amendments.

  • Pest Management. We will adhere to the USDA’s Organic standards to prevent pathogens in our pest management systems

  • Harvesting. We will adhere to the USDA’s Organic standards to prevent pathogens in harvesting procedures

  • Packing. We will adhere to the USDA’s Organic standards to prevent pathogens in packaging procedures.

  • Transportation. We will adhere to the USDA’s Organic standards to prevent pathogens in transportation procedures. 

 

  • Potential Risks. The potential risks associated with these pathogens include decreased crop production, risks to livestock health and risks to human health. 

  • Prevention Plan. Our prevention plan to reduce the above risks is to adhere to the USDA’s Organic standards in preventing pathogen contamination in all of our daily operations.

  • Monitoring Practices. In order to properly monitor these risks, we will implement monitoring practices, and recordkeeping processes to verify and document that our pathogen contamination and risk plan is effectively implemented.

 

5) Facilities. We utilize the following post-harvest handling, storage, packing and processing facilities and equipment: wash sinks, wash table, root-washer, storage bins, knives, root-cellar, walk-in cooler.

 

  • Potential Risks. The potential risks associated with these facilities include pathogen exposure and transfer and injury due to mishandling of tools and equipment.

  • Prevention Plan. Our prevention plan to reduce the above risks include rigorously following and adhering to the USDA’s Organic standards for food safety, practicing and following protocol for standard operating procedures in terms of tool and equipment handling

  • Monitoring Practices. In order to properly monitor these risks, we will implement monitoring practices, and recordkeeping processes to verify and document that our pathogen contamination, risk plan and standard operating procedures are effectively implemented.

13624 S. Cottonwood Rd

Bozeman, Montana 59718

406.201.1324‬

hello@bodhi-farms.com

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